BloodLine Presents: Updates on Current Treatment Options for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the Transplant Setting

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy. In the United States, an estimated 185,000 people are currently living with this disease, and it accounted for more than 9,000 new cases of cancer in 2015. Chemotherapy and radiation provide long-term benefit to the majority of patients with HL; however, some patients will eventually relapse.

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Reviews: Examining Targeted Therapies for Hodgkin Lymphoma in the Post-Transplant Setting: Reason for Optimism

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy. In the United States, an estimated 185,000 people are currently living with this disease, and it accounted for more than 9,000 new cases of cancer in 2015. Chemotherapy and radiation provide long-term benefit to the majority of patients with HL; however, some patients will eventually relapse.

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Reviews: Management of Multiple Myeloma: Using Emerging Therapies with ASCT

In this CME activity, leading experts in multiple myeloma will review changes in the treatment paradigm, optimal patient selection for transplant, and data from recent clinical trials. They will also provide insight into new strategies for individualized management, the role of early versus late transplant, and how to incorporate novel therapies into clinical practice.

Interactive Updates in The Use of Stem Cell Mobilization for the Treatment of Blood Related Cancers

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) is a well-established treatment for hematologic malignancies such as multiple myeloma (MM) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Various changes in the field over the past decade, including the frequent use of tandem aHSCT in MM, the advent of novel therapies for the treatment of MM and NHL, plus the addition of new stem cell mobilization techniques, have led to the need to reassess current stem cell mobilization strategies.

Risk Factors and New Methods of Treatment of Myelofibrosis: Transplantation in the Era of JAK Inhibitors

Although myelofibrosis (MF) is the least common of the myeloproliferative neoplasms, it is the most lethal with a median survival of only 3-5 years. Cytopenias and leukemic transformation are the major causes of death. For many years palliation of symptoms with alkylating agents or hydroxyurea was the only therapy available and this had little or no effect on the survival of patients with MF.

Interactive Updates in Non-Transplant Therapy of MDS

Aplastic anemia (AA), the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) are rare diseases that all result in bone marrow failure—the ineffective formation of circulating blood cells—leading to anemia, bleeding, infection, and death in many cases, even with modern therapies. Once thought of as distinct, these three diseases are now believed to be linked by similar pathophysiologic pathways. Of the three bone marrow failure diseases, MDS currently has the largest number of therapeutic drugs available, although none of them is curative. Much of the current confusion and controversy in MDS treatment stems from the lack of consensus on which therapies to use in which patients, and what realistic outcomes might be.