Blood and Marrow Transplantation Reviews: Optimal Use of Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients with Multiple Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy. In the United States, an estimated 185,000 people are currently living with this disease, and it accounted for more than 9,000 new cases of cancer in 2015. Chemotherapy and radiation provide long-term benefit to the majority of patients with HL; however, some patients will eventually relapse.

Blood and Marrow Transplantation Reviews: Breakthrough Therapies for Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy. In the United States, an estimated 185,000 people are currently living with this disease, and it accounted for more than 9,000 new cases of cancer in 2015. Chemotherapy and radiation provide long-term benefit to the majority of patients with HL; however, some patients will eventually relapse.

BloodLine Presents: Updates on Current Treatment Options for Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in the Transplant Setting

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a pathologically and clinically heterogeneous hematologic malignancy. In the United States, an estimated 185,000 people are currently living with this disease, and it accounted for more than 9,000 new cases of cancer in 2015. Chemotherapy and radiation provide long-term benefit to the majority of patients with HL; however, some patients will eventually relapse.

Interactive Updates in The Use of Stem Cell Mobilization for the Treatment of Blood Related Cancers

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) is a well-established treatment for hematologic malignancies such as multiple myeloma (MM) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Various changes in the field over the past decade, including the frequent use of tandem aHSCT in MM, the advent of novel therapies for the treatment of MM and NHL, plus the addition of new stem cell mobilization techniques, have led to the need to reassess current stem cell mobilization strategies.

Risk Factors and New Methods of Treatment of Myelofibrosis: Transplantation in the Era of JAK Inhibitors

Although myelofibrosis (MF) is the least common of the myeloproliferative neoplasms, it is the most lethal with a median survival of only 3-5 years. Cytopenias and leukemic transformation are the major causes of death. For many years palliation of symptoms with alkylating agents or hydroxyurea was the only therapy available and this had little or no effect on the survival of patients with MF.